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How To Find Out What Is Oncor Electric Delivery

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Oncor Electric Delivery Company logo

Oncor is the largest utility company in the state of Texas and provides reliable delivery of electricity to more than 3.5 million advanced smart meters throughout parts of north, central and west Texas. Oncor operates the largest distribution and transmission system in the state of Texas, and is the 5th largest utility in the US. 

What does Oncor do?

Oncor owns, manages, and operates the poles, wires and all of the required infrastructure to get electricity from the power plant delivered to your home or business. They also read your electric meter each month and report that data back to your provider for billing purposes. Additionally, they are the first to respond in the event of a power outage or emergency, and are charged with restoring power to the grid. In the event there are trees close to power lines, within 10ft, then they also provide tree trimming services as well.

Which parts of Texas does Oncor serve?

Oncor operates more than 140,000 miles of transmission and distribution lines in more than 400 communities and 98 counties in Texas. It serves the areas that are open to deregulation, where you have an opportunity to choose your retail electric provider. Some of the major cities Oncor serves include Dallas, Fort Worth, Arlington, Irving, Sherman, Denison, Tyler, Waco, Temple, Killeen, Round Rock, Midland and Odessa to name a few.

Oncor Electric Delivery’s Service Area

Oncor however, does not, provide to service to municipally-owned electric utilities and electric cooperatives like Coserv, City of Garland, Farmers Electric Cooperative, Grayson-Collin Electric Cooperative, Trinity Valley Electric Cooperative, to name a few in the north Texas area.

For a comprehensive list of all Texas electric cooperatives, click here, and to see their maps, click here.

Comparing electricity rates in Oncor

Honest Gorilla helps customers in Oncor compare multiple energy providers and plans, helping residents save time and money. We work with a variety of energy providers to give you what you’re looking for. Whether you want long-term or short-term contracts, prepaid, or renewable energy, we have options for you. Our comparison tool is straightforward and helps you make sense when others cost you money. Visit Honest Gorilla to get the best electricity plans in Texas!

When you sign up for service with a retail electric provider, they also connect you with Oncor. There is no separate contract that you need to sign or additional service that you need to setup. Your poles and wires charges, or the cost of delivery (aka TDU Delivery Charges), is included in your electric bill either as a separate line item or it is bundled in your rate.

Current and Historical TDU Delivery Charges in Oncor

Oncor’s TDU Delivery Charges are fees regulated by the Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUCT). Historically, they are updated on March 1st and September 1st of each year. These charges are really a bundle of tariffs approved by the PUCT. They help pay for things like the maintenance of the poles and wires and meters that service your home, and any system upgrades or repairs from weather event. The TDU Delivery Charges are passed through in the monthly electric bill without markup, and are the same regardless of who supplies the electricity.

Effective Date Monthly
Charge
$/kWh Change
September 1, 2022 $3.42 $0.044076
March 1, 2022 $3.42 $0.038907
September 1, 2021 $3.42 $0.041543
March 1, 2021 $3.42 $0.034928
September 1, 2020 $3.42 $0.039220
March 1, 2020 $3.42 $0.035448
September 1, 2019 $3.42 $0.038447
March 1, 2019 $3.42 $0.031350

Please continue to check this page from time-to-time as we will be maintaining and updating the list above with the most recent TDU Delivery Charges currently in effect.

How to get in touch with Oncor

  • To report a power outage or speak with Oncor: 888-313-4747
  • To report a power outage online: click here
  • To track or check the status of your local power outage: click here
  • To set outage alerts and stay in the know: click here
  • For general inquiries: 888-313-6862
  • To locate underground power lines: 811

Looking for ways to save? Oncor can help

Through its “Take a load off Texas” initiative, Oncor offers rebates and discounts to help you operate an energy efficient home and ultimately help lower your energy bills. Oncor’s incentive program covers nearly all aspects of your home and provides meaningful discounts on things like HVAC, lighting, insulation, weatherization and thermostats to name a few. Click here to learn what discounts you can get. Get started.

History of Oncor

As the largest electric delivery company in Texas, Oncor has a long tradition of serving more than 13 million households and businesses in the Lone Star State. Dating back to its founding in 1912, Oncor has gone through a few name changes and iterations. The company traces its history to the beginnings of electric service in north Texas.

Predecessor companies include Dallas Power & Light (DP&L, founded in 1917 with roots dating to 1882), which served the city of Dallas. Texas Electric Service Company (TESCO, founded 1929 with roots dating to 1885), which served Fort Worth and areas west of Abilene. And, Texas Power and Light (TP&L, founded 1912), which served other areas of northern and west-central Texas. All three companies were owned by the Electric Bond and Share Company, a subsidiary of General Electric.

DP&L, TP&L and TESCO were connected by a single grid in 1932. The three companies were deemed to be an integrated system with the passage of the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935. In 1945, Texas Utilities was formed as a publicly owned holding company that owned DP&L, TP&L and TESCO. The three operating companies continued to operate separately until 1984. That is when they were merged into one operating company, called TU Electric (“TU” meaning “Texas Utilities”). 

When TU became TXU

Texas Utilities came to be known as TXU following acquisitions of The Energy Group plc for $10 billion in 1998 in the United Kingdom and a power generator in Australia. By 2000, TXU became the fifth largest energy company in the world after its purchase of NORWEB from United Utilities and two municipal utility companies in Germany, Stadtwerke Kiel and Braunschweiger Versorgungs AG.

TXU acquired by Energy Futures Holding (EFH)

On October 10, 2007, TXU was purchased by private equity firms KKRTPG Capital, and Goldman Sachs Capital Partners and formed Energy Futures Holding (EFH). As part of the buyout, the electric distribution part of the company became Oncor Electric Delivery and the electric generation business became Luminant, leaving TXU Energy as solely a retail provider of electricity, without any electrical distribution or production assets.

The buyout left Dallas-based Energy Future with a debt of more than $40 billion. It was a gamble that natural gas prices would rise and give its coal-fired plants a competitive advantage. Instead, natural gas prices fell sharply. Consequently, Energy Future Holdings was mired in financial problems, leading to the April 29, 2014 filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

On October 31, 2016 NextEra Energy, Inc. (NYSE: NEE) reached an agreement for an affiliate to merge with Texas Transmission Holdings Corporation (“TTHC”), including TTHC’s approximately 20 percent indirect interest in Oncor Electric Delivery Company LLC (“Oncor”), for merger consideration of approximately $2.4 billion.

On November 9, 2017, Sharyland Utilities and Oncor successfully closed their proposed transaction to exchange Sharyland’s retail distribution operations for a set of Oncor’s transmission lines in West and Central Texas. As a result, all of Sharyland’s approximately 54,000 retail distribution customers were transitioned and started service with Oncor.

Who owns Oncor

On March 8, 2018, regulators in Texas approved Sempra Energy‘s purchase of a majority stake, indirect ownership interest of 80.25% in Oncor for $9.45 billion. The remainder is owned by Texas Transmission Holdings Corporation (“TTHC”), accounting for 19.75%.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Will Oncor send someone to read my meter?

Now that advanced smart meter technology has been installed at every home and business, meter readers are no longer deployed. Your meter information is electronically transmitted each and every month to Oncor which then gets passed on to your retail electric provider for billing purposes.

How can I find out how much electricity I am using?

You can view your electricity usage at the Smart Meter Texas website. The website stores daily, monthly and 15-minute interval electric usage data recorded by your smart meter.

Is there a way that I can read my own smart meter?

Since everything is digitized, the best and safest way to read your meter and review advanced graphs and charts about your energy consumption is to visit the Smart Meter Texas website.

How can I find out my meter reading cycle?

You can find out your meter reading (or billing) cycle on your monthly electric bill. It is typically a single or double digit number. To then find out what day of the week it falls on, or other interesting details, Oncor publishes its meter reading cycle for every year. It details the days in which it is read as well the number of days in each billing cycle. Here are the billing cycles for 2022, 2021 and 2020.

Does Oncor know when the power goes out?

Generally, yes. But that’s if their systems detect it. A good way to ensure that your outage is reported and to stay informed is to enroll in the My Oncor Alerts program. You can also call Oncor at any time to report a power outage by dialing 888.313.4747.

Why is my power off, but my neighbor across the street still have their lights on?

In many instances, your neighbor may have their power on when you don’t because their home is on a different set of lines or circuit. You can report a power outage or check the status of a previously reported power outage via our online reporting tool. You can also call us at 888.313.4747. If you have signed up for My Oncor Alerts, text OUT to 66267 (ONCOR).

Who does a builder or developer contact to establish service for a new construction project?

You can request service for a new construction project here. This site will guide you through the process depending on the type of new construction project you are building (residential, commercial & industrial, multi-family residential, or subdivision developer). If you still need help, contact Oncor’s New Construction Management Center at 888.222.8045 or send an email to c3ncmc@oncor.com.

Who do I contact if I’m adding a brand new structure to my property that needs electrical service?

You can request service for a new construction project here. This site will guide you through the process depending on the type of new construction project you are building (residential, commercial & industrial, multi-family residential, or subdivision developer). If you still need help, contact Oncor’s New Construction Management Center at 888.222.8045 or send an email to c3ncmc@oncor.com.

Why is my electric bill so high?

The most common cause of a high electric bill is the weather. As the temperature outside becomes more extreme, so can electric bills. Your electric bill is based on the amount of electricity you use and the rate charged by your Retail Electric Provider (REP) which includes Oncor’s cost to deliver the electricity to your home or business. For more information, contact your REP at the number listed on your bill. You can also learn more seasonal energy efficiency tips in our Ways to Save page.

What is a Distribution Cost Recovery Factor or DCRF filing?

The Distribution Cost Recovery Factor (DCRF) is an annual filing that allows utilities like Oncor to recover investment in facilities used to serve customers, like distribution lines, substations, transformers, and meters. The ability to file a DCRF encourages utilities to invest in facilities to improve reliability and connect new customers and helps defer the need for more frequent rate case filings. The DCRF filing also serves to smooth out customer rates over time, as opposed to larger rate impacts that may occur if changes were only made in major rate cases, which take place approximately every four years.

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